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Deviled Eggs Tips from my readers

From Sarah - something to try:

coconut ginger eggs - unbelievably good.

Hard boiled eggs, coconut milk, pink sushi ginger (chopped finely) and some of the pickling juice from the ginger, salt.

Sounds weird but it's a major hit every time I bring it anywhere.

Thanks for the recipes!

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From Mama Dear:

Hello, love the info on the egg boiling and everything. My grandma taught me to crack the eggs and leave them in water the same way. Just wanted to send you a tip... If you are calorie concious and dont want to use all that mayo, add a teaspoon of milk to every 4 egg yolks and mash up, then add the mayo and other ingredients. That way the filling holds its shape better and they aren't over-mayo'd. Keep on deviling!

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From Matt:

I just wanted to thank you for all the great information! I found your site a while back when "deviled eggs" were requested at work potluck. I am the type to go big or go home, so I wanted some official results. Your detailed, step-by-step instructions insured some serious, tasty success. Since my initial batch, I have made them several more times and I brought two dozen to a Christmas party last night. Lots of paprika and chives made a beautiful holiday presentation. I love the original recipe, although I substitute the mustard powder with regular dijon, and add my secret... a few drops of black truffle oil. I just wanted to compliment you on your site, and thank you again. Have a great holiday. Peace. Matt

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From Jean:

I found a site, Iowa Egg Council that states if you let your eggs sit overnight on their side, the yolks will be in the middle of the white. (editor's note: we recommend the same thing.) I am going to try it this weekend. Another thing that I have tried is Julia Childs recipe for HB eggs is to use the Pressure Pan to cook them, I know for a fact that really works great if you are making a lot of eggs, you can use really fresh eggs, they really peel easy.

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From Pamela:

When I boil my eggs, I first add a few teaspoons of salt to the water before boiling it. The salt is not to help the shells become soft. It's actually to raise the boiling point of the water so that the eggs cook faster. The water will come to a boil slower, but the water temperature will be higher. Here is a link to an article that describes the chemistry involved: http://www.newton.dep.anl.gov/askasci/gen01/gen01021.htm

If you want to soften the shells, you just need to add a little bit of white vinegar which reacts with the calcium in the shell making them soft. For a fun trick, try soaking one raw egg in vinegar for 2-3 days. The shell will completely dissolve away and you will be left with a 'rubber egg'. Just the membrane will remain; really fun experiment for kids.

I also place my eggs in a metal vegetable steamer before dropping them into the water. Here's a photo of what I'm talking about: http://i.ehow.com/images/GlobalPhoto/Articles/5294043/MISC177-main_Full.jpg This makes them easier to lift out. I just use a fork and hook the little ring to lift them out. I do make a modification to the steamer though. I use a little bit of wire (like the little wires that you can get at the supermarket in the produce section to close your produce bags, you know? Just peel off the paper) to secure the "leaves" of the steamer into a basket. Otherwise, when you lift out the basket, the eggs can fall back into the boiling water. Sorry, but I don't have a photo to show you.

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From Jeremy:

Hi... enjoyed your deviled egg site and got some good info on how to make the perfect eggs... one thing i wanted to add, and you probably have heard it before, but... have you ever used a little fishing line to slice the eggs in two? I think any thin line or line or thread will do but I use a nice, light weight fishing line... clean slices and kinda fun.